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HOW TO USE A MALE CONDOM

WHY USE CONDOMS?

Condoms are the best-known, affordable, and effective method to prevent HIV infection and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as syphilis, gonorrhea, and some types of hepatitis. 

The male condom is latex and must be placed on the erect penis before penetration.

WHERE TO GET CONDOMS?

Male condoms are distributed free of charge at the AGUILAS – LGBT Center (1800 Market St. 4th Floor, Suite 403S an Francisco,

CA 94102-6227); therefore, no barriers or conditions should be imposed for you to obtain them. Pick up as many male condoms as you think you need, check our office hours online for a time that works best for you. You can also participate in our events that take place once a month, where free lubricants and condoms are distributed.

HOW TO PUT A CONDOM ON

First things first: Before you use a condom, check the expiration date. Just like cheese, condoms can go bad. (Outdated condoms break easier.) Put the condom on before your partner’s penis touches your vulva. Pre-cum—the fluid that leaks from a guy’s penis before he ejaculates—can contain sperm from the last time the guy came.

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ONE CONDOM PER ERECTION, PLEASE (SO STOCK UP).
BE CAREFUL NOT TO TEAR THE CONDOM WHEN YOU’RE UNWRAPPING IT. IF IT’S TORN, BRITTLE, OR STIFF, TOSS IT AND USE ANOTHER. 

  1. Open the condom package carefully on one side to ensure you do not tear the condom.

  2. Put a drop or two of lube inside the condom. It’ll help the condom slide on, and it’ll make things more pleasurable for your man. Make sure the condom is facing the right way before you put it on (the rolled-up outside will have to be facing up, but always unroll a little to be sure).

  3. If your partner isn’t circumcised, pull back his foreskin before rolling on the condom.

  4. Leave a half-inch of extra space at the tip to collect the semen, then pinch the air out of the tip.

  5. Unroll the condom over the penis as far as it will go.

  6. Smooth out any air bubbles—they can cause condoms to break. Keep your nails as far away from the condom as possible. There you have it, and  must place the condom correctly.

  7. Then lube up, and get at it.

  8. After they're done, hold the condom by the base as you take it out, then tie it in a knot before throwing it away.

Relatively simple, right? And condom packs come with instructions included to answer any questions you may have.

 

After ejaculation, you should remove the condom with the penis still erect and close the opening with your hand to prevent the sperm from coming out. Afterward, you must tie a small knot in the middle of the condom and throw it in the trash because for each intercourse, and you must use a new condom.

We should also use condoms during contact between the genital organ and the mouth or anus to prevent these organs from being contaminated with some disease.

HOW TO USE IT? 

Handling the condom is very easy. You need to follow the correct way of use. Train before - so you don't miss the moment. During foreplay, putting a condom on your partner can become a pleasurable moment.

ATTENTION: Never reuse a condom and never use two condoms simultaneously, as they may break or burst.

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WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS AND BENEFITS?

There are positive and negative things to say about each and every method. And everyone’s different—so what you experience may not be the same as what your friend experiences.

 

THE POSITIVE

  1. Protects against STIs, including HIV

  2. Cheap and easy to get a hold of

  3. No prescription necessary

  4. May help with premature ejaculation

 

THE NEGATIVE

  1. Unless you’re allergic to latex, condoms cause no physical side effects (only 1 or 2 out of 100 people are allergic, and if you happen to be one of them, you can always use a plastic condom instead)

  2. Some people may be sensitive to certain brands of lubricant (so, if the lube bugs you or your partner, try another brand)

  3. Some guys complain that condoms reduce sensitivity

  4. Hard to remember to use if you’re drunk (but that might be when you need one most, so keep them on hand anyway!)

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SEVERAL TYPES OF MALE CONDOMS VARY IN SIZE, COLOR, THICKNESS, MATERIAL, AND EVEN FLAVOR. THEY CAN BE EASILY PURCHASED AT PHARMACIES AND SOME SUPERMARKETS. IN ADDITION, CONDOMS CAN ALSO BE PURCHASED AT HEALTH CLINICS FOR FREE. SEE WHAT TYPES OF CONDOMS ARE AND WHAT EACH ONE IS FOR. HERE ARE SOME OF THOSE  DESCRIPTIONS:

There are positive and negative things to say about each and every method. And everyone’s different—so what you experience may not be the same as what your friend experiences.

 

SPERMICIDE

These condoms are lubricated with a chemical that kills sperm. They are ok for the use of vaginal intercourse, but not recommended for oral or anal sex.

 

SPERMICIDE-FREE

Women and men who are sensitive to spermicide can use spermicide-free condoms. Condoms have very few side effects. This type has even less.

 

LATEX

Elastic fantastic latex can stretch up to 800%. These are the most common condoms. But don’t use them with oil-based lube. They can break or slip off if you do.

 

NON-LATEX

Allergic to latex? Prefer oil-based lube? Then these are for you. Usually made from polyurethane, other synthetic high tech materials, or natural lambskin.

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THE CORRECT WAY TO USE A MALE CONDOM CONDOMS

(DO'S AND DON’TS)

YOU MUST WITH CONDOMS 

• YOU MUST - use a condom every time you have sex.

• YOU MUST - put on a condom before having sex

• YOU MUST - read the packaging and check the expiration date.

• YOU MUST - ensure that there are no tears or defects.

• YOU MUST - store condoms in a cool, dry place.

• YOU MUST - use latex or polyurethane condoms.

• YOU MUST - use water or silicone-based lubricant to prevent breakage.

 

YOU MUST NOT WITH CONDOMS

• YOU MUST NOT -  keep condoms in your wallet as heat and friction can damage them.

• YOU MUST NOT -  use nonoxynol-9 (a spermicide) as this product can irritate.

• YOU SHOULD NOT - use oil-based products such as baby oil, lotion, Vaseline, or cooking oil because they cause the condom to break.

• YOU MUST NOT - use more than one condom at a time.

• YOU MUST NOT - reuse a condom.

THE IMPORTANCE OF USING LUBRICANTS 

IN SEX BETWEEN MEN

Our anus does not produce natural fluids like the vagina. Therefore, during anal sex, fluids are essential, but we cannot use any product. Cracking the correct lubricant prevents its use, such as use and waxing, and sexually transmitted systems (STIs), in addition to making the relationship more comfortable and pleasurable for both.

1 -  In addition to not being a good lubricant, the risk of using saliva from STIs, mainly chlamydia, coprophilia than the use of saliva, mainly chlamydia, and s. Many are asymptomatic saliva, mainly from chlamydia. Sex-for-sex studies also for older men who practice with men who have oral intercourse with condoms

2 -  Vaseline and other petroleum-based essential oils can dissolve the latex in the condom, so they are not safe.

3 - Margarine, coconut oil, butter, cooking oil: we are experiencing a kind of natural wave, an alternative to more ecological products to replace in everyday life. I think they are super valid, but not for anti-inflammatories. These products can damage the latex, carry microorganisms, and irritate your anus and rectum.

4 - Shampoo, conditioner, and baby oil: they have other substances, perfumes, that can cause durability in the mucosa of your anus and rectum. What types of antacids can I safely use? 

5  Water-based lubricants: they are available in pharmacies and are relatively affordable. They were made for precisely that: sex! So abuse and smear! Ass not to replace the consolidation, just saliva at the time of excitement...

6 - Silicone-based lubricants: You can find these at sex shops on the internet, but the lubrication lasts longer than the water-based ones and they are safe to use with a condom.

HARM REDUCTION

In the scope of prevention of STIs, HIV/AIDS, and viral hepatitis, harm reduction actions are aimed mainly at people who use alcohol and other drugs, industrial liquid silicone, and hormones and seek to prevent transmission, promote improving the quality of life, and ensuring access to health.

Actions can range from offering inputs, singularly, to prevent sexual or parenteral transmission, through behavioral interventions,

to structural interventions related to reducing stigma, inequities, and barriers to access to health.

People who use alcohol and other drugs, regardless of the pattern of use, are a population disproportionately affected by STIs, HIV/AIDS,

and viral hepatitis, whether in terms of risk of sexual exposure or sharing objects for drug use.

In addition, drug use is a practice found in all other key and priority populations for HIV, other STIs, and viral hepatitis.

​​Call us:
+1.415.558.8403

​Find us: 

AGUILAS (LGBT Center)
1800 Market St. 4th Floor, Suite 403
San Francisco, CA 94102-6227

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